Tag Archives: African Methodist Episcopal Church

Poor, black, and female: Amanda Berry Smith preached holiness in the teeth of racism


What follows is this week’s talk in the series I am doing at Messiah Episcopal Church, St. Paul, MN, on people from my book Patron Saints for Postmoderns who model aspects of social justice:

In the first decades of the nineteenth century, Christian revival kindled on the American frontier, drawing new strength through camp meetings and circuit riders. By the mid-1800s, however, the Victorian era was in full swing, and evangelical churches founded in the white heat of frontier enthusiasm were building lavish faux-gothic facades and enjoying the refined preaching of educated, citified ministers.

In reaction, many Victorian Americans yearned to experience again the fiery devotion of their parents and grandparents. Continue reading

“No respecter of persons”: Recession threatens historic black church and Crystal Cathedral alike


The Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal C...

The Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church

This church is one of the 11 most endangered historic places in the nation.

It’s the Metropolitan AME Church, located on M Street between 15th and 16th streets in downtown Washington, DC.

According to a recent article in “DCist,”

The church hosted Frederick Douglass‘s and Rosa Park’s funeral, had President Taft, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Bishop Desmond Tutu as speakers, and held pre-inaugural prayer services for President Clinton. Continue reading

Frederick Douglass’s church on the endangered list


Historic D.C. church lands on most-endangered list

The crumbling church, dedicated in 1886, has hosted notable civil rights figures and statesmen but now faces a repair bill of about $11 million, which it cannot afford.

Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, May 19, 2010

The glorious stained-glass Episcopacy Window has been removed, its empty frame high above M street now covered with sheets of plastic.

Water has damaged the plaster walls near the oak-and-pine pew where abolitionist Frederick Douglass sat. And the ceiling that collapsed not far from where the body of civil rights icon Rosa Parks rested is concealed by planks and scaffolding.

Although the curving pews of Washington’s Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church still embrace the memory of those who hallowed the structure, on Wednesday it is scheduled to be named among the nation’s most endangered historic places.

More than a century after it was dedicated in 1886, the red brick edifice at 1518 M St. NW, which has hosted presidents, statesmen and some of the greatest figures in the nation’s struggle against racial oppression, is crumbling.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation plans to announce that the church is included on its 2010 list of the country’s most endangered historic sites.

Continue here.

Historic D.C. church lands on most-endangered list

The crumbling church, dedicated in 1886, has hosted notable civil rights figures and statesmen but now faces a repair bill of about $11 million, which it cannot afford.

Network News

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Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, May 19, 2010

The glorious stained-glass Episcopacy Window has been removed, its empty frame high above M street now covered with sheets of plastic.

This Story

// <![CDATA[
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// ]]>Water has damaged the plaster walls near the oak-and-pine pew where abolitionist Frederick Douglass sat. And the ceiling that collapsed not far from where the body of civil rights icon Rosa Parks rested is concealed by planks and scaffolding.

Although the curving pews of Washington’s Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church still embrace the memory of those who hallowed the structure, on Wednesday it is scheduled to be named among the nation’s most endangered historic places.

More than a century after it was dedicated in 1886, the red brick edifice at 1518 M St. NW, which has hosted presidents, statesmen and some of the greatest figures in the nation’s struggle against racial oppression, is crumbling.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation plans to announce that the church is included on its 2010 list of the country’s most endangered historic sites.